Septem Microbrewery - The Best from Greece


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Catagories: Alcohol & Spirits
Area: Central Greece, Euboea
Every day has its unique taste


“In Latin the name “Septem” means seven which represents the number for creation and which inspired us, as every type of beer that we produce will be named after a different day”.

Our creation

Our model microbrewery Septem was founded in the Municipal District of Orologio at the Municipality of Avlona in Euboea by the chemist and oenologist Sofoklis Panagiotou and by the economist Georgios Panagiotou. In June 2009, it began distributing fresh, bottled, unpasteurised beer to the marketplace.

“In Latin the name “Septem” means seven which represents the number for creation and which inspired us, as every type of beer that we produce will be named after a different day”.
Our mission…

Is to provide our customers with fresh, high quality products, by taking advantage of the wealth of aromas and flavours in malt and hops and by searching for diverse flavours.
…our philosophy

Responsible for the design and production of our products are a Greek and an English oenologist who created their own microbreweries in their back in their own countries respectively. Oenologists dedicate their lives to searching for the perfect structure and balance in their wines in order to bring out the attributes of the variety, microclimate and harvest. We apply the same “oenological” philosophy when producing all of own products in the Septem microbrewery.
We believe that a careful approach as well as processing the best quality malt and using only of whole hop flowers are reflected in the aroma and taste that characterises of our products.
We believe that beer is not only a refreshing alcoholic beverage but a product that offers gastronomic pleasure in a similar way to wine, malt whiskey, coffee…

Our vision

To become a Greek microbrewery whose products, in the mind of the consumer, will become synonymous with gastronomic pleasure and will become point of reference for a differentiated quality beer. Our aims

We want to offer today’s consumer differentiated original flavours.
We want to be the leaders of renewal and innovation.
We want to satisfy the consumer’s requirement for fresh, certified and quality products.
We want to contribute in the economic development in our area by supporting the idea of recycling and respecting the protection of the environment.

 Our Beers

Septem Monday's Pilsner, 5vol. 330m

Hop: Whole hops of the Northern Brewer & Perle varieties

Fermented at a temperature of 9-11ο C, beer matures for 6 weeks at a low temperature

Fresh, unpasteurized, filtered beer
Serving temperature: 4 - 6ο C
A golden blonde colour, firm creamy froth.
Distinguished by its full aromas of flowers, citrus and hop.
A slight sweet flavour, with the discreet presence of malt and a refreshing acidity and bitterness that bring out the strong aromatic aftertaste, with the aromas of flowers, caramel and honey dominating.

 

Septem Friday's Pale Ale, 4,7vol. 330ml

Hop: Whole hops of the Northern Brewer & Perle varieties

Fermented at a temperature of 9-11ο C, beer matures for 6 weeks at a low temperature

Fresh, unpasteurized, filtered beer
Serving temperature: 4 - 6ο C
A golden blonde colour, firm creamy froth.
Distinguished by its full aromas of flowers, citrus and hop.
A slight sweet flavour, with the discreet presence of malt and a refreshing acidity and bitterness that bring out the strong aromatic aftertaste, with the aromas of flowers, caramel and honey dominating.

 

Septem Monday's Pilsner, 5vol. 500ml Hop: Whole hops of the Northern Brewer & Perle varieties

Fermented at a temperature of 9-11ο C, beer matures for 6 weeks at a low temperature

Fresh, unpasteurized, filtered beer
Serving temperature: 4 - 6ο C
A golden blonde colour, with firm creamy froth.
Distinguished by its full aromas of flowers, citrus and hop.
A slight sweet flavour, with the discreet presence of malt and a refreshing acidity and bitterness that bring out the strong aromatic aftertaste, the aromas of flowers, caramel and honey dominate.

 

Septem Sunday's Honey Golden Ale 6,5vol. 330 ml

 

The Brewery Process

The production of beer may be conventionally divided into seven stages:

Extraction of malt, Wort filtering, Wort boiling and clarification, Alcoholic fermentation, Filtration, Standardisation. The first three stages consist of the wort production procedure, which takes place at the brewery.

 

Extraction of malt


Malt milling

Barley malt is an essential raw material needed for the production of beer, whilst other cereal grains such as wheat, maize and rice are widely used in the brewing process. Malt is produced by malting the barley, a procedure that can in brief be described as a process aimed at activating the enzymes that can degrade the yeast contained in the barley into simpler fermentable sugars (forms of sugars that can produce alcohol during the alcoholic fermentation).

Initially the malt must be grinded, so that on the one hand its surface can increase and the extraction of yeast and its remaining ingredients can become easier and more effective and on the other, to separate the outer shell from the endosperm. The milling method is very important as it directly affects the subsequent wort filtering.

Premix

 

As the grinded malt is placed in to the mash tun it is mixed together with the hot water for brewing in a special pre mixer that allows it to be evenly doused with water and grinded.

Extracting – Grinding

Depending on the level of malt modification and the type of beer that we are producing, the malt mash’s temperature increases gradually in order to activate specific enzymes so that the carbohydrates and peptides can be degraded in to types of sugars and proteins that can be metabolized by the yeast during the alcoholic fermentation. The temperature must increase uniformly across the mass of malt, as the location for optimal action and enzyme deactivation depends directly on the temperature. This is why the extraction cup contains a powerful mixer and insulation, one hand to achieve a uniform mass of malt and on the other to avoid a loss of temperature towards the outside environment.

Wort filtering

Once the extraction has been completed, and the ingredients from the malt have been transferred to the wort, they are then separated. This separation takes place in the lauter tun. The specific tun consists of a false bottom where the bed of sediment from the malt settles, the latter acts as filtering “package” enabling the wort to pass through ending up in a special collection tanks and in turn is transferred to the wort kettle.

The separation stage can be distinguished by to two stages: initially the collection of undiluted wort from the mash and then dousing the malt with hot water in order to extract the remaining sugars. The lauter tun contains a specific mixer which enables the separation of the wort, and the extraction of larger amounts of sugars from the malt. The main aim during lautering is for the wort to demonstrate less opacity and greater clarity, especially significant traits that indicate the quality of beer produced.

Boiling the Wort – Adding hops

Boiling the wort ensures that it is sterilised and as a result prevents any contamination from the malt. During the boil, hops are added contributing to the aroma and the bitter taste of the beer.The organoleptic contribution to the final product is determined by the variety of hops and the time they are added. At the same time, during the boil unstable proteins flocculate and the Ph of the hop is reduced, whilst certain contents with negative organoleptic behaviour are carried are also swept along by the steam, mainly the precursors of dimethyl sulfide (DMS).

After the boil, the sterilised wort is centrifuged in a tank that has a specific geometrical shape (Whirlpool). The purpose of the centrifuge is to achieve natural clarity and to remove the sediment bed created during the boil and the additional hops from the wort. Placing the wort into the tank is done tangentially aiming to form a circular movement to the interior. This specific circular movement forces the sediment bed that has a larger actual density, to be guided to the centre of the Whirlpool forming a cone thus enabling the removal of the clear wort from an exit placed at the perimeter of the tank.

Following on, the clear wort, with a temperature that reaches 100ο C, is cooled at 12 -16ο C, with the use of a plate heat exchange, and is sent to the fermentation tanks.

Fermentation

Yeast is added to the fermentation tank, to the cooled wort, so that the alcoholic fermentation can begin. At this stage, the yeast metabolizes the sugars that were extracted from the malt into alcohol and carbon dioxide.

Alcoholic fermentation in modern breweries takes place in stainless, cyrindral and cone shaped tanks (Unitanks). These specific tanks, due to their special geometrical shape, allow the removal of yeasts from the bottom, therefore allowing the beer to mature in these.


Maturation

Once the alcoholic fermentation is complete and the sugars have almost completely metabolised, the alcoholic fermentation process slows down and the yeasts settle at the tank bed. At this stage beer temperature and approaches 0 ο C, so that the yeasts can settle at a faster pace also bringing along proteins that agglomerate at these temperatures. At the same time at this temperature certain phenolic compounds with an unpleasant smell insolubilize, rendering the beer softer and fruitier.

Filtration

Filtration enables us on the one hand, to stabilize the beer’s flavour and on the other hand, to achieve its clarity and a brilliant colour. It must be noted that not all types of beers are filtered, as some mature in unfiltered bottles. Filtering permits the removal of solids or yeasts from the beer. Depending on filter porosity, it is possible to remove all microorganisms that may alter the beer’s taste (sterilising filtration).


Standardization

Standardization is the procedure transferring the beer from storage tanks to bottles or to barrels, in order to be market it. This specific procedure is especially important as beer’s greatest enemy is oxygen. This is why bottling must be carried out with great care so that the beer does not come in contact with oxygen whilst being transferred to bottles. At the same time the bottling procedure must be carried out in a sterilized environment, as the existence of microorganisms can contaminate the beer and lead to unwanted fermentation in the bottle resulting in degrading the product.

 

 

 

 

 

Septem Microbrewery  Every day has its unique taste
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